Tag Archives: Dennis’ 7 Dees

‘Mum’s the Word

19 Sep

By Linda Kay Harrison

When the days become a little shorter, and the nights a little longer, hardy Chrysanthemums take notice and begin their magnificent fall display of color. Chrysanthemums are one of the most popular perennials in the world, because of their fall blooming habit.  When many other perennials are done for the season, the hardy Mum is just getting started.  A pot of bright colored ‘mums’ is sure to help ease the painful farewell to summer.


Hardy mums come in a wide variety of flower colors, including white, yellow, gold, bronze, red, burgundy, pink, and lavender. Mums grow to about 2 or 3 feet high, depending on the cultivar and growing conditions.  They are easy to grow and are long lasting as cut flowers.

Chrysanthemums work great in pots, but can also go right into the ground.  They need well drained soil, and plenty of sunlight.  They look great planted in masses, but don’t over crowd them, they need good circulation to avoid disease.  To keep your mums a tight and busy plant, it’s a good idea to cut them back to about 8 to 10 inches after they are done blooming, then when the new spring growth is about 4 to 6 inches, pinch or cut back the center of the plant to encourage side shoots to fill in.  Pinching just an inch or two every 3 or 4 weeks is enough.  Then stop pinching by early summer so that flower buds can set. Don’t forget a good fertilize for your mums.  We recommend Dr. Earth Bud and Bloom once a month from early spring to about July or early August for the best fall display.

Check out the beautiful selection of Chrysanthemums at any of our Dennis 7 Dees locations!

Planting in the Fall Makes Cents!

6 Sep

by Linda Kay Harrison

At the garden centers, we are often asked, “Is fall REALLY a good time to plant?”
The answer is… “Actually… yes!”

In the Pacific Northwest almost anytime is a good time to plant; but there really ARE some very good reasons to do it in the fall.

When new plants are installed in the spring or summer they have to go through the stressful heat of the summer with a small root system.  They are often expected to bloom and sometimes even produce fruit under these stressful conditions. That can take a lot out of a young plant.

By filling your beds in the fall, your plants miss out on most of that stress. With the days being shorter, photosynthesis slows and stops, so plants aren’t actively growing. They go dormant and often don’t even know they’ve been moved.  Even though the air is cooler, the ground is still warm, so the roots keep growing for weeks or even months without having to produce nutrition for growth or blooming. By the time your plants ‘wake up’ in the spring, their roots are strong and pretty well established in their new home.

You’ll also want to plant with plenty of Black Forest compost to break up that nasty clay soil, and give the roots something to work with over the winter.


One more great reason to plant in the fall… BARGAINS!  Even though the selection may be smaller, the sales and specials are fantastic!  You can save a lot of dollars, and that makes a lot of ‘cents’.

So when you tuck those plants into their beds for the winter, you can feel confident knowing that you saved a bundle, and your new plants will ‘wake up’ happy and ready to grow in spring.

A Front Yard Facelift

30 Aug

By John Curtis – Landscape designer at Dennis’ 7 Dees

Have you ever thought about how to modernize a tired looking front yard?  The same one you have been walking past for so many years and wondering what could be done to freshen it up.  Here is an example of a front yard renovation project that gives a new look to an older style home.

The first goal was to create an updated look to the front entry.  Another was to improve the handicap access of the front walkway.  Because the entire front yard lawn sloped towards the house there was also a seasonal drainage issue that needed to be addressed.  Water would accumulate around the front of the garage and entry during periods of heavy rain.

The design plan called for removal of the dated brick planter and entry walkway.  The brick planter was replaced with a simple soil mound and large boulders.  The brick walkway was replaced with a modern concrete paver pathway which was built up on both sides as it approached the front porch.  This eliminated the steps and created a smooth surface and transition to the front porch that is easy to negotiate.

To solve the drainage issue, a decorative ‘dry creek bed’ was constructed with perforated drain pipe underneath to intercept any seasonal water build up and carry it away from the front of the garage and entry.

The owner had previously taken out some large trees and opened up planting areas that had been mostly shady in the past.  Now these areas had a sunny, southwest, exposure and needed new plantings to fit the change in sunlight conditions  The plantings were designed with a mix of evergreens, seasonal perennials and ornamental grasses to give a long lasting display of colors and interest throughout the spring and summer.

By implementing these landscape improvements, the entire look of this 1950’s ranch style home was successfully updated and the handicap access and drainage issues were effectively resolved.

Home-Grown Tomato Tasting Festival

29 Aug

SAVE THE DATE: Saturday, September 15th @ Lake Oswego & Sunday, September 16th @ SE PowellThere’s no better way to end summer than with a beautiful harvest of fresh, juicy, colorful tomatoes. Each September our Lake Oswego garden center host an annual FREE home-grown Tomato Tasting Festival to celebrate this wonderful summer fruit and for the community to enjoy the delicious varieties available in the Northwest. We partner with our growers and a few employees pitch in to provide 50+ unique sizes, shapes, colors & flavors. For this first year we will be expanding this event to our SE Powell location.

Mark your calendar for Saturday, September 15th 10am-4pm at Lake Oswego & Sunday, September 16th 10am-4pm at our SE Powell garden center.

Tomato guru, Nicole Forbes, cooks up yummy salsas & tomato recipes for all attendees to enjoy and to inspire those with too many tomatoes to handle. For the first year ever we will not only be tasting all the wonderful fruit but will have a few select varieties for sale as well.

Attendees will have a chance to vote for their favorite variety and plan their crops for next year. Stay tuned for this years winners!

Interested in entering our Salsa contests? Call Nicole Forbes at 503.777.1421 for details!

Delightful Ornamental Grasses

21 Aug

By Linda Kay Harrison

You probably have a spot in your garden or landscape that needs a little ‘something’, right?  Lots of people do, but are not sure what to do with it. Consider adding ornamental grasses.

Ornamental grasses are a wonderful addition to any garden.  There is a size and shape to fit almost any space. Some grasses have a graceful arching habit, while others are very upright and vase shape.  They provide an appealing texture and contrast to most garden plants. There are grasses for both sun and shade, and most varieties can also provide year-round interest.

Landscape project completed by Dennis’ 7 Dees at PDX Headquarters

Grasses also come in a wide variety of colors and textures. In addition to green, there are grasses that are tones of bronze, reds, yellows, golds, silvers, blues and even black. Some grasses have narrow, wispy blades, and some are bold, with wide leaves and fleshy stalks.

PDX Headquarters

Most ornamental grasses produce a plume or seed head that adds an element of interest beginning in late summer and that, if left uncut, will usually last through the winter.  The best time to cut back most ornamental grasses is late winter or very early spring, just as the new growth starts popping up.

Here is a brief list of some of our favorite grasses:

Sun grasses:

Blue Oat Grass

Fescue ‘Elijah Blue’

Liriope

Molina ‘Variagata’

Miscanthus ‘Morning Light’

Calamagrostis ‘Karl Forster’

Pennisetum ‘Karley Rose’

Carex – ‘Prairie Fire’

 

Shade grasses:

Carex ‘Sparkler’ and ‘Evergold’

Japanese Forest Grass

Ophipogon ‘Black Mondo’

Juncus ‘Gold Strike’ and ‘Unicorn Rush’

Lazula ‘Aurea’

 

Evergreen grasses:

 

Blue Oat Grass

Fescue ‘Elijah Blue’

Liriope

Carex

Juncus

 

Grasses can add a contemporary look to containers especially when paired with annual succulents!

Dennis’ 7 Dees carries a wide variety of ornamental grasses and their knowledgeable staff can help you find just the right grass for that spot that needs that little ‘something’ special.

Breathtaking Water Features

20 Aug

By Drew Snodgrass – Landscape Designer at Dennis’ 7 Dees & one of the original Dees                                                                                                                                                                Ready to tackle a most rewarding landscape improvement? Water features are a breathtaking addition to the landscape but please consider avoiding the pitfalls that create high maintenance and a less than attractive final result.

Designed by Drew Snodgrass of Dennis’ 7 Dees

  1. Plan for success, determine the look you want whether simple or small, such as a column spoutingwater or a waterfall as large and elaborate as you want and have room for.
  2. Verify pump and electrical needs and where best to place and draw power.
  3. Locate the feature and orient it for maximum viewing appeal. My very strong recommendation is to make it safe and easy to maintain.
  4. You should not have to empty your water feature for cleaning. A skimmer vault, bottom drain and bio falls will make maintenance as easy as dumping out a collection bag on a regular basis. Water is drawn to the pump through a recessed collection bag and filter plate where surface debris is collected before it has a chance to settle to the bottom of your pond and decompose. The bottom drain circulates the water, also drawing it through the collection and filter plate in the vault. Algae will still grow on rocks but the water will be clear.
  5. For safety, fence out unwanted visitors as necessary or you can have a very shallow water feature with 1-4” of water while kids are small, but dig the pond as deep as you will ultimately like. Fill with river rock and surface the river rock with pea gravel to the desired depth. Later you can remove rock to the new desired depth as time goes on.
  6. If you want fish, (they’ll feed on the algae),you should allow for 3’ of water depth plus 6” of pea gravel covering the floor. Bridge in hiding places above the pond floor.
  7. Vertical sides will deter raccoons and shelving the sides of the pond makes it easier to stack rock to hide the liner. Keep the look as natural as possible and remember you must hide the liner completely.
  8. If you want water plants plan for them as you build your pond. Buy a pot the size of the plants you want. Research the ideal depth of water for the plant. Set the empty pot where you want the plant and hide all but the top as you rock in the liner.
  9. After cleaning the pond thoroughly, fill it, add de-chlorinator and then add the plants when water PH is ready. Cover the roots with the pea gravel.
  10. Once the water feature is complete you should consider adding lighting. Lighting spillways with underwater lights from the base of falls or from the sides, pointing toward spillways and away from views is important, (See the effect, not the fixture or source).

Although this sounds like a fun DIY project it really is lots of work and the easiest way to do any or all I’ve suggested is call Dennis’ 7 Dees Landscaping, (503)777-7777, get a great design, free estimate and have us install a beautiful and low maintenance end result.

The photos included in this article are of some of my water feature installations. . Water features are one of my favorite elements to incorporate into the landscape.

Drew Snodgrass, CLP, Dennis’ 7 Dees Landscaping

Changing the Landscape of Homelessness

15 Aug

Dennis’ 7 Dees 22nd Annual Charity Golf Tournament benefiting Human Solutions

Thursday,  September 13th @ Langdon Farms

Since 1988, Human Solutions has developed a wide range of effective programs to assist families and individuals to find successful pathways out of poverty and homelessness toward self-sufficiency. Human Solutions helps families and individuals gain prosperity which in turn helps our greater community to thrive.

Dean & David Snodgrass

Dennis’ Seven Dees has committed to help Human Solutions in their fundraising efforts to better assist families and individuals in the Mid and East Multnomah Counties. Last
year we raised nearly $30,000 and this year a we have sent a goal of $50,000. Your participation as a player in this tournament will help them continue their good work right at a time when the weather will begin to change and shelter is more important than ever.

Click here to REGISTER to golf. Your registration includes 18 holes of golf with cart, continental breakfast, on-course games, hole-in-one contest, awards barbecue luncheon and more.


In conjunction with the tournament, Human Solution is holding a Golf Ball Drop Raffle.

On September 13, 2012 at 7:00 am at Langdon Farms Golf Club, a helicopter will drop up to 1,000 golf balls numbered from 1 to 1,000. If your ball is first to enter the designated hole (or is the closest to the hole) you will win $1,000 !!!

Raffle proceeds will help support Human Solutions emergency shelter and housing programs for homeless families. On any given night, Human Solutions provides shelter and/or housing to more than 450 people in over 150 homeless families.

Tickets are $10 each.

A special thanks to our wonderful event sponsors – the tournament wouldn’t be possible without your support!

       

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